Cervical cancer is more aggressive when human papillomavirus is not detected

Cervical cancer negative for the human papilloma virus (HPV) is rare but more aggressive: it is more frequently diagnosed at advanced stages, with more metastasis and reduced survival. These conclusions are published in Modern Pathology. The study was co-led by ISGlobal, an institution supported by “la Caixa”, the Hospital Clinic and the University of Barcelona.

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Scientists decipher 3D structure of a promising molecular target for cancer treatment

Columbia University scientists, in collaboration with researchers from Nimbus Therapeutics, have demystified a metabolic enzyme that could be the next major molecular target in cancer treatment. The team has successfully determined the 3D structure of human ATP-citrate lyase (ACLY) – which plays a key role in cancer cell proliferation and other cellular processes – for the first time.

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Genome-wide analysis reveals new strategies to target pancreatic cancer

For some cancers, initial treatment with chemotherapy brings positive, but only temporary, results: tumours shrink, but then rebound as the cancer becomes drug-resistant. This pattern of remission-resistance-relapse is particularly true for pancreatic cancer, an aggressive disease in which early success is often countered by eventual disease progression.

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Discovery may lead to precision-based strategy for triple negative breast cancer

According to the paper now available online, TP53 is the most frequently mutated gene in triple negative breast cancer, meaning it is fuelling the growth of this aggressive form of breast cancer. However, the problem with trying to target mutated TP53, specifically, is that it is not a druggable target, because of its potential toxicity – or ability to kill – nearby healthy cells.

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